Radon Mitigation – Practical Application

by

Today, I was fortunate to join the famous Doug Kladder in the assessment of 2 homes for Radon mitigation. Doug works for NEHA and is the expert in this field. Please read this little introduction of Doug below. I must study now for my exam tomorrow so I will have to tell you more about this experience in future posts.

Doug Kladder Joins NEHA Staff.

 

Editor’s note: NEHA’s support capabilities continue to grow with the addition of Douglas L. Kladder, program manager for the Center for Environmental Research and Training (CERT) and the National Radon Proficiency Pro grain (NRPP), two new NEHA programs. Some NEHA members who have attended NEHA- or state-sponsored educational programs on radon are acquainted with Mr. Kladder. He has been intimately involved with the development of radon technology since the mid-1980s. In addition, he has been an instructor for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA’s) regional radon training centers and the primary author of several educational programs and texts about the measurement and mitigation of radon.

Readers may also have heard of his work as president of Colorado Vintage Companies, Inc., which was subcontracted to NEHA in 1998 to develop our Radon Credentialing Program when U.S. EPA discontinued its National Radon Proficiency Program.

Kladder operates out of NEHA’s Colorado Springs office and can be reached by phone at (719) 477-1714 or by e-mail at [less than]dkladder@neha.org[greater than]. He introduces himself below

When U.S. EPA announced it was going to relinquish its stewardship of the National Radon Proficiency Program, I became very concerned about maintaining public confidence in an issue that requires trust. After all, why should we be concerned about something we can’t see or smell! Consumers are extremely skeptical of any “gimmick” that unethical contractors could use to their advantage. This concern was revolving in my mind during a course I had been asked to teach for Larry Marcum at NEHA. At some point in the course, I realized the answer was right in front of me. The professionalism of the staff and of the NEHA members in attendance allowed me no doubt: NEHA was the answer to the dilemma of maintaining consumer confidence in a privatized radon program, and, as they say, the rest is history.

In the course of working as a subcontractor to NEHA, I realized that several personal career goals could be met within the organization rather than as a subcontractor on just the radon program. To me, NEHA represents a vast pool of knowledge and experience. By harnessing knowledge, we have the opportunity to develop some very practical and innovative research and educational programs. I am nothing but impressed with the talent and convictions of NEHA membership.

Several people have asked me why I am leaving a successful company I founded 14 years ago to join a more structured environment. Well, it has always been my intention to re-enter the corporate world. I began my career as a chemical engineer with Eli Lilly and Company, designing and operating fine pharmaceutical manufacturing operations. It was a great experience, but at times not conducive to entrepreneurial approaches. I also was a plant manager at a TSDF facility for McKesson Robbins, recycling spent industrial solvents-noble in mission, but still not conducive to individual innovation. I had to start my own company to develop that type of environment. But always in the back of my mind has been the goal of finding an organization that not only has solid ethics and ideals, but also could be innovative and creative in its approach. Nelson Fabian and Larry Marcum have proven to me in both word and deed that NEHA is such an organization. So now, as an employee, I look forward to using all my experience and ent repreneurial spirit to create an environment where individual ideas and strengths are used to further the cause of environmental health. 

Doug Kladder Joins NEHA Staff.

 

 

Editor’s note: NEHA’s support capabilities continue to grow with the addition of Douglas L. Kladder, program manager for the Center for Environmental Research and Training (CERT) and the National Radon Proficiency Pro grain (NRPP), two new NEHA programs. Some NEHA members who have attended NEHA- or state-sponsored educational programs on radon are acquainted with Mr. Kladder. He has been intimately involved with the development of radon technology since the mid-1980s. In addition, he has been an instructor for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA’s) regional radon training centers and the primary author of several educational programs and texts about the measurement and mitigation of radon.

 

Readers may also have heard of his work as president of Colorado Vintage Companies, Inc., which was subcontracted to NEHA in 1998 to develop our Radon Credentialing Program when U.S. EPA discontinued its National Radon Proficiency Program.

 

Kladder operates out of NEHA’s Colorado Springs office and can be reached by phone at (719) 477-1714 or by e-mail at [less than]dkladder@neha.org[greater than]. He introduces himself below

 

When U.S. EPA announced it was going to relinquish its stewardship of the National Radon Proficiency Program, I became very concerned about maintaining public confidence in an issue that requires trust. After all, why should we be concerned about something we can’t see or smell! Consumers are extremely skeptical of any “gimmick” that unethical contractors could use to their advantage. This concern was revolving in my mind during a course I had been asked to teach for Larry Marcum at NEHA. At some point in the course, I realized the answer was right in front of me. The professionalism of the staff and of the NEHA members in attendance allowed me no doubt: NEHA was the answer to the dilemma of maintaining consumer confidence in a privatized radon program, and, as they say, the rest is history.

 

In the course of working as a subcontractor to NEHA, I realized that several personal career goals could be met within the organization rather than as a subcontractor on just the radon program. To me, NEHA represents a vast pool of knowledge and experience. By harnessing knowledge, we have the opportunity to develop some very practical and innovative research and educational programs. I am nothing but impressed with the talent and convictions of NEHA membership.

 

Several people have asked me why I am leaving a successful company I founded 14 years ago to join a more structured environment. Well, it has always been my intention to re-enter the corporate world. I began my career as a chemical engineer with Eli Lilly and Company, designing and operating fine pharmaceutical manufacturing operations. It was a great experience, but at times not conducive to entrepreneurial approaches. I also was a plant manager at a TSDF facility for McKesson Robbins, recycling spent industrial solvents-noble in mission, but still not conducive to individual innovation. I had to start my own company to develop that type of environment. But always in the back of my mind has been the goal of finding an organization that not only has solid ethics and ideals, but also could be innovative and creative in its approach. Nelson Fabian and Larry Marcum have proven to me in both word and deed that NEHA is such an organization. So now, as an employee, I look forward to using all my experience and ent repreneurial spirit to create an environment where individual ideas and strengths are used to further the cause of environmental health.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: