Radon Testing – Simple and Safe

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Now that I’ve highlighted the danger of radon and the need for testing as recommended by Health Canada, I will start to explain the simple and easy testing process.

The following is an exerpt from the Health Canada website that outlines simple radon testing.

Radon testing is relatively simple and inexpensive.   Commercial services are available to homeowners who wish to measure radon levels in their homes. Radon test devices can also be found in some hardware retailers across Canada, Health Canada is working with a number of retailers to increase the availability of these devices. The most popular long term radon detectors are the the electret ion chamber and the alpha track detector. These devices are exposed to the air in a home for a specified period of time, and then sent to a laboratory for analysis. Radon is measured in units called “becquerels per cubic meter” (Bq/m³).

It is not uncommon to see radon levels in a house change by a factor of two to three or more over a one-day period. Seasonal variations can be even more dramatic with the highest levels usually experienced during the fall and winter months when air circulation and ventilation is decreased.

Since the radon concentration inside a home varies over time, measurements gathered over a longer period of time are generally considered to give a more accurate picture of the radon exposure. Health Canada recommends that homes be tested for a minimum of three months, ideally during the winter months as the radon concentrations are usually representative at this time.

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